STAR WARS
FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS
Answers to your questions about the Star Wars movies, the Star Wars books, and the Star Wars Universe in general. If you don't find your answer here, you can Ask Yoda.

  1. Movies & TV
  2. The Books
  3. The Star Wars Universe

The Star Wars Movies & TV Shows

Who made the Star Wars movies?
Many people helped in the making of the Star Wars movies, but the creator of Star Wars is George Lucas. Lucas came up with the idea and stories for the movies, and until retiring in 2012, he had editorial control over all the Star Wars stories. He also wrote and directed several of the movies. For some of the movies, he chose other people to write the scripts and direct the filming. However, the scripts were still based on his own stories, and he could still make decisions about the filming. Besides Star Wars, George Lucas also made American Graffiti and Willow, and he helped produce the Indiana Jones movies, which were directed by his friend Steven Speilberg. Future Star Wars movies will be made by other people, though for now Lucas is still participating as a consultant.

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What order should I watch the Star Wars movies in?
It's up to you. The stories of the six Star Wars movies take place in a different order than the movies were released, so you can watch them either in the order they were made (like the first generation of fans did) or in the order that they take place (like many young people do now). The six existing Star Wars movies, in the order the stories take place, are:

Episode I: The Phantom Menace (1999)
Episode II: Attack of the Clones (2002)
Episode III: Revenge of the Sith (2005)
Episode IV: Star Wars: A New Hope* (1977)
Episode V: The Empire Strikes Back (1980)
Episode VI: Return of the Jedi (1983)

Coming soon:
Episode VII: (title forthcoming) (2015)

If you look at the release dates of the movies, you can see that the first six were released in the order 4-5-6-1-2-3. Many longtime fans of Star Wars prefer to watch them in this order, because it's the order that they originally experienced them in. This order also preserves some of the big suprises in the story (they won't be surprises if you watch 1-2-3 first). However, others prefer to watch the movies in the order 1-2-3-4-5-6, because then you can experience the whole story in order.

*Note: Episode IV: Star Wars: A New Hope was originally just called Star Wars, before they decided to make more movies.

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Will there be a Star Wars sequel trilogy with Episodes 7, 8, and 9 (VII, VIII, and IX)?
Yes! In the 1980's, George Lucas said he would like to make nine or more Star Wars movies, but then for almost 30 years said that he wouldn't anymore. However, with the recent sale of Star Wars and Lucasfilm to Disney, it has been announced that there will indeed be more films. Episode 7 is currently scheduled for release in 2015. At this point, we don't know yet what the new movies will be about (stories posted on the website SuperShadow.com are fake).

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Is it true that they're making a live action Star Wars TV show?
Yes, this is true, though the project seems to be going very slowly. It was originally targeted for 2010, but still isn't ready for release yet. We don't know yet what it will be about, but Lucasfilm says it will likely take place between Episodes III and IV, and put the spotlight on minor characters of the Star Wars galaxy instead of the main movie characters. For a summary of what is known (and rumored) about the new series, check out the Star Wars live-action TV series article on Wookieepedia. There is also an upcoming animated Star Wars comedy series, called Star Wars Detours.

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I heard something on SuperShadow.com. Is it true?
Probably not. All of the information on SuperShadow.com is either fake or taken from other people's websites. Almost any other Star Wars website can tell you that SuperShadow is a fraud, and even representatives from the official Star Wars website at StarWars.com have commented on the fakeness of SuperShadow's information. For more about SuperShadow, check out this Wookieepedia article, or do a search for "supershadow" and look at the other search results besides SuperShadow.com itself. For honest and mostly accurate information about Star Wars, I recommend www.TheForce.net (the biggest Star Wars news site) and Wookieepedia (a fan-made encyclopedia of all things Star Wars). If you want only the officially approved and verified news, you can go to Lucasfilm's official Star Wars website at www.StarWars.com.

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Star Wars Books

Are the Star Wars movies based on books?
No. The books of Star Wars Episodes 1-6 are based on the movie scripts, not the other way around. Authors are hired to write them while the movies are being filmed, so the book can be released a few months before the movie. Other books are new stories, separate from the movies. There's a possibility that future movies could be based on the exisiting books, but it's probably more likely they will have original stories.

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There's so many Star Wars books - what are they all about?
A few of the books are based on the movies. The rest tell stories that take place before, during, between, or after the movies. For example, some books tell about the events of the Clone Wars between Episodes II and III, while others tell the adventures of Luke, Han, Leia, and Chewbacca after Episode 6 (VI).

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Who writes the Star Wars books?
Not George Lucas. Even the first Star Wars book, which says "by George Lucas", was actually written by fantasy author Alan Dean Foster (based on Lucas's movie script). Instead, Lucasfilm and its contracted publishers choose professional science fiction and fantasy authors to write books in the Star Wars universe. Authors whose Star Wars books prove popular are often invited back to write more.

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I want to write a Star Wars book. Can I get it published?
Probably not, unless you are already a published science fiction or fantasy author. Lucas Licensing and its partner publishers currently only hire professional authors to write Star Wars books. Even if you are already a published author, you can't just submit a Star Wars book or publish one yourself - you'll have to contact a licensed Star Wars book publisher (such as Del Rey) to discuss your interest and get your project approved before they'll hire you.

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I want to read Star Wars books. Where should I start?
It's up to you! Browse through them and find something that sounds interesting. Most Star Wars books are written with you in mind: just pick up a book and you should be able to follow, except maybe if it's in the middle of a particular series. A lot of the books that take place after Episode 6 (VI) build on each other's stories, so they might be best read in order, but it's certainly not required! For most other eras, it really barely matters at all, because most of the books tell basically stand-alone stories. If you're really hardcore, you could try to read all the Star Wars books in order, but it might be tricky, because there are so many, and more are coming out all the time. To see a list of all the full-length Star Wars novels in the order they take place, check out Yoda's Datapad's Star Wars Book List. For more information about upcoming Star Wars books, see: What new Star Wars books are coming, and when will they be out?

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What new Star Wars books are coming, and when?
To see a list of upcoming Star Wars releases (including books, comics, and more), I recommend the Eddie van der Heijden's Once Upon A Galaxy release schedule. Eddie is one of the most dedicated fans of the Star Wars Expanded Universe, and this is a very well maintained and accurate compilation of information collected from the Star Wars publishers.

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Does George Lucas personally approve every Star Wars book?
No, not personally. When he was president of Lucasfilm, he employed a dedicated staff of editors and licensing staff in a division of the company called Lucas Licensing. It's the job of the people at Licensing to decide what Star Wars books and other stories are published, and they're also in charge of making sure the stories fit together as well as possible. However, until recently George Lucas's personal approval was required for certain things, such as the deaths of characters from the movies, and he sometimes designated certain topics or time periods to be off limits (for example, before he made Episodes I-III, authors weren't allowed to write their own stories about that time period). Lucas Licensing will continue to function now that Lucas has retired and sold his company to Disney, but he will probably not be making any decisions personally anymore.

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Does George Lucas read the Star Wars books?
Apparently not. He hasn't publicly expressed much interest in what happens outside of the movies and TV series, and he even has said that in his own imagination, the stories in the books nevered happened (though he did give his permission for other people to write the books). On the other hand, he has shown some interest in the Star Wars comic books, even deciding to include a character from the comics, Aayla Secura, in Episodes II and III (Quinlan Vos, another character from the same comics, was almost in Episode III, but his scene was cut before filming).

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The Star Wars Universe

What species is Yoda, and where is he from?
No one knows the answers to these questions except perhaps George Lucas himself. He has intentionally left out this information, and it probably will never be revealed, because Lucasfilm prefers to keep it a mystery. If you've heard that Yoda's species is called a "Whill" and that he is from the planet "Grentarik" (or that his last name is "D'Kana"), this is incorrect. This is fake information made up by SuperShadow.

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Who trained Yoda as a Jedi?
This used to be just another one of the mysteries of Yoda's past (See also: What species is Yoda, and where is he from?). However, Star Wars Galaxy magazine published an article in the 1990's saying that Yoda's Jedi Master was named N'Kata Del Gormo, and that Del Gormo's species was Hysalrian. The article was based on a competition for the magazine's readers, and for a long time no one was sure if it really counted. But according to comments from Lucas Licensing's continuity director, Leland Chee, the article is now considered a valid part of the Star Wars continuity.

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I heard that Boba Fett survived his "death" in Return of the Jedi (Episode 6). Is this true?
Yes, according to books, comics, and other sources approved by Lucas Licensing, Fett did escape the Sarlacc and went on to continue bounty hunting for many more years. George Lucas has said that in his own idea of the story, Boba Fett died in the Sarlacc. This is consistent with his usual position that the books, comics, and other stories are cool stories but not necessarily part of his personal vision of Star Wars. This doesn't mean the stories from the books and comics are invalid or not correct - it just means that George Lucas considers the "Expanded Universe" (stories outside of the movies and TV shows) to be a separate story from his own vision.

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What's the difference between a Sith and a Dark Jedi?
The Sith are followers of a cult of evil Force-users originally founded by stray Jedi. The term "Dark Jedi" refers specifically to a former Jedi who has fallen to the dark side. Or in casual use, it could refer to any dark side user. So all Sith could maybe be called Dark Jedi, but not all Dark Jedi are Sith.

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Why does Obi-Wan say in Episode 5 that Yoda trained him? Didn't Qui-Gon?
The answer is that they both trained him. As seen in Episode II, very young Jedi trainees are taught in groups at the Jedi Temple by Yoda. When they get to be about 12 years old, they are chosen individually as apprentices. So Obi-Wan trained under Yoda as a child, then was chosen as an apprentice by Qui-Gon.

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How old are the characters in each movie?
Check out Yoda's nifty table of Star Wars character ages!

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